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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Orange Shirt Day and National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

"Wearing an orange shirt on Friday, September 30 is one way to show respect for Indigenous communities while helping to encourage difficult but necessary conversations about Canada’s dark history pertaining to Indian residential day and industrial schools."
-Alyssa McLeod, Indigenous Community Engagement Co-ordinator, Ontario Tech University

Friday, September 30 is Orange Shirt Day and the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

It's a day for:

  • Education and reflection on Canada's involvement in the former residential school system. 

  • Recognition, remembrance and respect for the survivors of residential schools. 

  • Understanding the generational impacts residential schools have had—and continue to have—on Indigenous communities.

Throughout the month of September, Indigenous Education and Cultural Services and the President's Reconciliation Task Force—in collaboration with Durham College—are committed to providing resources, initiatives and programming, to engage in learning and calls to action to advance Canada's Truth and Reconciliation process. 

Make a pledge to Truth and Reconciliation

Pledge your commitment and understanding to Truth and Reconciliation in person or online
Pledge options - Make a pledge to Truth and Reconciliation
In Person:
  • Monday, September 26
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Science Building, West Atrium and Shawenjigewining Hall, Lower-level Atrium

  • Tuesday, September 27
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room 

  • Wednesday, September 28
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Charles Hall, Lower-level Lobby

  • Thursday, September 29
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Science Building, West Atrium and Shawenjigewining Hall, Lower-level Atrium

  • Friday, September 30
    • 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room
    •  
Virtually: 

Make a pledge

Orange Shirt Day T-shirts

All proceeds will be donated to a GoFundMe page to purchase a new wheelchair for Elder Dorothy Taylor.

Purchase an Orange Shirt - Orange Shirt Day T-shirts

OSD shirt design 2022Thank you for your support. Orange shirt sales have now closed.

Through Elder Taylor's ongoing work with the university, she continues to provide all of us with an opportunity to learn about Indigenous history, culture and present-day experiences, and has made a lasting impact on many of us.

She was diagnosed with Limb and Girdle Muscular Dystrophy in December 2000.

Each shirt can be purchased for $20 to help support her in purchasing a new wheelchair

 

Bannock and Books Club

September's book is Beyond the Orange Shirt Story by Phyllis Webstad
Learn more - Bannock and Books Club

Phyllis WebstadBannock and Books brings hearts and minds together as we explore various topics pertaining to Indigenous culture, ways of knowing, and experiences. 

September's book was Beyond the Orange Shirt Story by Phyllis Webstad, the featured author, founder of Orange Shirt Day, and Ambassador of the Orange Shirt Day Society. The sharing circle took place on September 19.

Pictured is Ms. Phyllis Webstad—the university proudly conferred her with the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa at our 2022 Convocation ceremony. Phyllis is seen embracing an inspired child, who attended the ceremony to show support for the work she does, and continues to do. 

Indigenous buttons

Join our Ambassadors and staff, and pick up a button in support of Truth and Reconciliation
Dates and times - Indigenous buttons

The university community is invited to drop by various stations located at both the north and downtown campus locations, to pick up a button in support of Orange Shirt Day and National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Ontario Tech's Ambassadors and staff will be available at each station to provide resources relating to the day, and to generate conversations around the university's commitment to Truth and Reconciliation. 

You're also invited to complete a pledge of support at each station, which will be displayed in Shawenjigewining Hall after September 30. 

Button pick-up schedule   

  • Monday, September 26
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Science Building, West Atrium and Shawenjigewining Hall, Lower-level Atrium
  • Tuesday, September 27
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room 
  • Wednesday, September 28
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Charles Hall, Lower-level Lobby

  • Thursday, September 29
    • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Science Building, West Atrium and Shawenjigewining Hall, Lower-level Atrium

Legacy of Hope Foundation

Peter Henderson Bryce: A Man of Conscience Exhibit
Exhibit details - Legacy of Hope Foundation

Exhibit launch

Join us as we kick off the exhibit! We'll have opening remarks, guest speakers, discuss Peter Henderson Bryce and be serving light refreshments.

Monday, September 26

  • 11 a.m. to noon
  • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room

Exhibit details

Peter Henderson Bryce: A Man of Conscience 

Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce was a Medical Health Officer for the Department of Indian Affairs and became Chief Medical Officer in 1904. He is recognized as a whistle-blower for his efforts in documenting the evidence of poor conditions in residential schools. This included deadly tuberculosis outbreaks and lack of remediation, as well as a general lack of sanitation leading to staggering death rates among students. In his writings, he held the federal government responsible for the conditions in residential schools. This exhibit will share details about Bryce’s work and his findings.

The university will be providing a donation to the Legacy of Hope Foundation.

September 26 to 30

  • Regular operating hours
  • North Campus Library, Front Foyer 

Mohawk Institute Residential School virtual tour

Join Woodland Culture Centre for a guided virtual tour of the former residential school
Learn more and register - Mohawk Institute Residential School virtual tour

About the virtual tour

The virtual tour will guide you through the former Mohawk Institute Indian Residential School, giving the history of the institution over its 140-year existence. You'll get to see different rooms inside the school—from the girls’ and boys’ dormitories, the cafeteria, the laundry room, and other rooms throughout the building. You'll also get to hear interviews from five of the school's survivors. 

Monday, September 26

  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
  • Zoom 

REGISTER FOR THE VIRTUAL TOUR

Project of Heart

Join this workshop to find out how you can act as an agent of reconciliation
Learn more and register - Project of Heart

About this workshop

Sylvia Smith created Project of Heart so that participants would be able to demonstrate—in a concrete way—that they are committed to standing with Indigenous people in their efforts to become self-determining people. Her hope is that Indigenous people see with their own eyes that a relationship built on trust can be achieved. 

In this workshop, you will increase awareness of the Truth and Reconciliation calls to action through social justice, by learning about Project of Heart and then creating your own gesture of reconciliation.

Both sessions will be facilitated by Nancy Hamer Strahl and Elder Mary Kelly. 

Staff session

Wednesday, September 28

  • 10 a.m. to noon
  • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room

REGISTER

Student session

Thursday, September 29

  • 5 to 7 p.m.
  • Shawenjigewining Hall, Room 131

Register

POSTPONED: The Indian Act with Elder Dorothy Taylor

Join Elder Dorothy Taylor, Curve Lake First Nation, for a presentation to learn all about the Indian Act

Due to unforeseen events this event has been postponed. 

Learn more - POSTPONED: The Indian Act with Elder Dorothy Taylor

About the presentation

Due to unforeseen events this event has been postponed. 

First introduced in 1876, the Indian act contained a number of federal laws that aimed to eliminate Indigenous culture in favour of assimilation into Euro-Canadian society. The act has been amended many times with changes focusing on the removal of discriminatory sections. It has enabled trauma, human rights violations, and social and cultural disruption for generations of Indigenous peoples. 

Join Elder Dorthy Taylor to learn about the Indian Act. Dorothy Taylor is a Mississauga Ojibwe Elder from Curve Lake First Nation. She is known for her work and traditional teachings about the sacredness of water. 

POSTPONED: Strawberry Ceremony

Join Elder Dorothy Taylor at the Strawberry Ceremony to learn about the significance of the heart berry in Indigenous culture

Due to unforeseen events this event has been postponed. 

Learn more - POSTPONED: Strawberry Ceremony

About the ceremony

Due to unforeseen events this event has been postponed. 

The strawberry is referred to in Indigenous culture as the heart berry, which means this ceremony will be led with your heart. The fruit is a significant food and medicine source for Indigenous people; it helps us understand the connection between mind, body, spirit and emotions. The heart berry also reminds us of the importance of reconciliation and teaches us how to maintain heartfelt relationships. 

Elder Dorothy Taylor, Curve Lake First Nation, will take us through a Strawberry Ceremony after her presentation on the Indian Act. 

 

Self-directed resources

Access resources such as ebooks, Indigenous languages learning items, treaties recognition information and more
Truth and Reconciliation resources - Self-directed resources

Truth and Reconciliation at Ontario Tech

The university has taken steps toward Reconciliation. Join us on Friday, September 30 as we discuss where we aim to go as we continue to work towards the future.
Learn more - Truth and Reconciliation at Ontario Tech

September 30

Ontario Tech: Steps to Reconciliation—what's been done and the next steps

Reconciliation and allyship are continuous processes and ones that we all need to engage in fully. Join Dr. Alyson King as she leads a discussion on the steps the university has taken toward Truth and Reconciliation, and where we are aiming to go to support Indigenous people as we work toward a brighter future.  

Time and location
  • 11 a.m. to noon
  • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room (in person)
  • Livestream

Please note: In-person space is limited and is available on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Sharing Circle

Join us for a sharing circle, for an open and safe discussion about reconciliation, what you have learned, and your thoughts and feelings. 

Time and location
  • noon to 1 p.m.
  • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room (in person)
  • Online

Please note: Space is limited and registration is required for the in-person Sharing Circle. 

Register for the in-person Sharing Circle

Closing remarks, moment of silence and Orange Shirt Day photo

Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to join as Dr. Steven Murphy shares closing remarks and leads the campus community through a moment of silence. 

Time and location
  • 1 p.m. 
  • North Campus Library, Dixon/Alger Fireside Reading Room

There will also be staff members available on September 30, should you wish to make a pledge of support for Truth and Reconciliation or learn more about the university's commitment to strengthening relationships with our Indigenous communities.